Making GLIAnet happen: Layers10

Q.  So, how can we make this GLIAnet concept happen?

A.  Layers10

To paraphrase an American politician, it will take an ecosystem.  (Or, to be precise, ten internetworked layers of an emergent GLIAnet ecosystem.)

Read More
Richard Whitt
Exploring the GLIAnet ecosystem

Over the last four weeks, I have been discussing what I see as the root cause for many challenges on the open Web today -- namely, a pervasive and growing trust and accountability deficit in online tech platforms.  I also have posited a particular way of bridging that deficit: building a new Web ecosystem that I call GLIAnet.  Today, I want to explore some of the ramifications of such an endeavor in a bit more depth.

Read More
Richard Whitt
Avatars, cloudlets, identity layers, dApps -- and other potential elements of a GLIAnet ecosystem

Last time, I discussed the importance of truly trustworthy and accountable entities -- acting legally and ethically as “countermediaries” -- to help us manage and promote our digital lives.  When we are able to select these entities, in a voluntary and consensual manner, to fully represent our personal interests, we can think of them as becoming our Digital TrustMediaries.

There are other potential components as well of a trustworthy and open GLIAnet ecosystem that actually serves the empowered human being. Here are a few.

Read More
Richard Whitt
GLIAnet: A viable solution to consider

My last two blog installments discussed one diagnosis on the “Why” of our current quandary on the open Web: a growing trust and accountability deficit in online technologies, and in particular the Platforms companies.  It seems, in fact, the Platforms and many others have benefited considerably from the Net’s openness, even as (other) intermediaries have faded away, or been rendered obsolete.


And yet, these same Platform companies seem not to be quite returning the favor.  Per Nassim Nicholas Taleb, by privatizing their gains and offloading their externalities, they lack sufficient “skin in the game.”  What, though, if we were able to go back, in a sense, to 1995, to the implicit social contract many of us believe we signed up to then?  What if we could inject some authentic trust and accountability back into a more decentralized, edge-based system? What if it were OK to be “open” with the Internet again?

Read More
Richard Whitt
The need for trust

As discussed last time, the grudging imprimatur granted to Ads+Data World transforms humans into users and consumers, in all aspects of our personal, and social, and economic, and political lives.  

That same platform-centric model now is being imported, without much forethought, into the brave new world of ubiquitous, always-on devices and computing and data flows.

Online technologies of potential control continue to emerge.

Read More
Richard Whitt
Why should we care? The human element

There was a User, and there was the Internet.

The Internet was open -- decentralized, peer-to-peer, with intelligence residing at either end.  Unlike the virtual “walled gardens” that preceded it, the Net provided people with choices, and innovations, and opportunities.  Indeed, some of its champions promised to eliminate unneeded, rent-seeking middlemen, calling it “disintermediation.” Instead, power would shift from network core to the edges of the Net -- and the ordinary user.

Read More
Richard Whitt